Browse "Education"

Displaying 376-390 of 593 results
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Mary Henderson

Mary Henderson. Soprano, teacher, b Longueuil (near Montreal) 17 Dec 1912. A study of the violin, begun at 10, led to a licentiate from McGill University. Her vocal studies, begun with Henri Pontbriand and Pauline Donalda in Montreal, were pursued in New York with C.

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Mary Lou Fallis

Mary Louise Fallis, CM, soprano, teacher, comedian, writer (born 22 April 1948 in Toronto, ON). Mary Lou Fallis has performed internationally in dramatic opera and as a classical singer but is best known for her comedic theatre works.

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Mary Munn

Mary (Elizabeth) Munn. Pianist, teacher, administrator, b Montreal 28 Jun 1909, d Calgary 10 Oct 1991; LRAM 1928, RAM Certificate of Merit 1929, M MUS (New England Cons) 1967, DMA (Boston) 1973, honorary LLD (Lethbridge) 1991.

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Maryvonne Kendergi

Maryvonne Kendergi, Armenian pianist, broadcaster, teacher, musicologist, administrator (b at Aïntab (now Gaziantep) Turkey 15 Aug 1915, naturalized Canadian 1960, d Montreal, 27 Sep 2011).

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Maureen Forrester

Maureen Kathleen Stewart Forrester, CC, O.ON, OQ, opera and recital singer, teacher, arts administrator (born 25 July 1930 in Montreal, QC; died 16 June 2010 in Toronto, ON). Maureen Forrester was one of Canada’s greatest and best-known classical singers. She was renowned for her remarkable trumpet-like contralto and her deeply emotive musical interpretations. The only classical performer other than Glenn Gould to be inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, she was admired greatly at home and abroad for her recitals, recordings and opera performances. She also served as chair of the Canada Council for the Arts, director of du Maurier Arts and chancellor of Wilfrid Laurier University. She received the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award, the Molson Prize, the Diplôme d’honneur from the Canadian Conference of the Arts and the Canadian Music Council Medal, as well as numerous other honours.

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Max Bohrer

Max (Alfred Edward Maximilian) Bohrer. Pianist, teacher, b Montreal 25 Feb 1860, d there 24 Apr 1942. He was taught by his father, William Bohrer, and was auditioned by Anton Rubinstein during the latter's visit to Montreal in 1873.

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Max Pirani

Max (Gabriel) Pirani. Pianist, teacher, b Melbourne 4 Aug 1898, d London 5 Aug 1975. His studies at the Melbourne Cons and later with Max Vogrich in New York preceded the formation (1923) of the Pirani Trio with the violinist Leila Doubleday (later Pirani) and the cellist Charles Hambourg.

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Max Wyman

Max Wyman. Writer, critic, educator, administrator, actor, b Wellingborough, England, 14 May 1939, naturalized Canadian 1979; honorary D LITT (Simon Fraser) 2003. Max Wyman studied piano and theory as a youth and began his career in journalism with the Northamptonshire Evening Telegraph at 14.

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May Lawson

May Lawson. Contralto, teacher, b West Calder, Scotland, 29 Mar 1901, d Winnipeg 28 Apr 1965. She arrived in Canada in 1914 with her parents and studied singing in Winnipeg with W. Davidson Thomson, Rhys Thomas, and Bernard Naylor and in Toronto with J. Campbell McInnes.

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Mechanics' Institutes

Mechanics' Institutes Established first in England during the 1820s, Mechanics' Institutes began as voluntary associations of working men seeking self-improvement through education. The community-based institutes offered evening lectures, lending libraries and periodical reading rooms.

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Melvin Berman

Melvin Berman. Oboist, teacher, b Hartford, Conn, 28 Feb 1929, d 2 Apr 2008; B MUS (Hartford) 1949, M MUS (Hartford) 1950. Melvin Berman studied oboe with Clement Lenom and Harold Gomberg.

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Métis Experiences at Residential School

Although the first residential schools in Canada were established with the intention of assimilating First Nations children into Euro-Canadian culture, Métis and Inuit children were also institutionalized in such facilities. Métis children experienced similar day-to-day conditions to those of other students in residential schools, but they were often considered “outsiders” by their peers and administrators. This perception affected their experiences within these institutions in particular ways.