Browse "Science & Technology"

Displaying 81-100 of 828 results
Article

Blacksmithing

All these workers practised a technology that came from the great French craft tradition; their highly skilled art derived from trade guild knowledge, instruction and scientific treatises.

Article

Blindness and Visual Impairment

In Canada the largest agency serving blind and visually impaired persons is The Canadian National Institute for the Blind. CNIB has 9 geographic service divisions with over 60 regional offices, and the CNIB Library for the Blind serves all areas of Canada.

Macleans

Blood Substitute Tested

According to medical lore, the ancient Incas were the first to attempt blood transfusions. And over the centuries doctors around the world have pumped everything from beer to urine into hemorrhaging patients.

Article

Bomarc Missile Crisis

The CIM-10B Bomarc was the world’s first long-range, nuclear capable, ground-to-air anti-aircraft missile. Two squadrons of the missile were purchased and deployed by the Canadian government in 1958. This was part of Canada’s role during the Cold War to defend North America against an attack from the Soviet Union. Prime Minister John Diefenbaker’s refusal to equip the missiles with nuclear warheads led to a souring of Canada’s relationship with the United States, especially once the Cuban Missile Crisis brought the issue to the fore. The issue split Diefenbaker’s Cabinet and contributed to his party losing the 1963 election.

Macleans

Book Review: The Drug Trial

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 9, 2005. Partner content is not updated.

WARS, EVEN THOSE FOUGHT on principle, are invariably sordid affairs. And so appears to have been the case with the all-out battle waged between Nancy Olivieri, a respected physician and scientist at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, and Apotex, one of Canada's biggest pharmaceutical companies.

Article

Botany

The study of plant life is organized in 3 ways, which are also applicable to zoological material.

Article

Botany History

Long before formal study of plants began in Canadian academic institutions, they were studied by explorers and talented amateurs.

Macleans

Bottled Water Debate

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on June 12, 2000. Partner content is not updated.

On a remote hillside about 50 km northeast of Walkerton, Ont., springwater flows to the surface to form a clear pool. The area, surrounded by trees and about 1.5 km from the nearest farm, is fenced. Every month, Echo Springs Water Co. Ltd. employees pump about 4.

Article

Botulism

Human botulism can occur primarily as food-borne botulism, infant botulism or wound botulism.

Article

Bridge Disasters

​There have been several fatal bridge disasters over the course of Canada’s history, some during construction, others after the bridge was in use for some time.

Article

Bridges

More remarkable was the use of an ice bridge across the St Lawrence River in the winters of 1880-81 and 1881-82, from Hochelaga to Longueuil [Montréal], to carry a standard-gauge railway; from January to March in each of those winters a small train, weighing 60 tons, safely used this unique bridge.

Article

British Columbia Eocene Fossils

Palaeontological and geological studies of these deposits go back about 130 years. These include work carried out by George Mercer Dawson in 1890 as part of his survey of British Columbia for the Geological Survey of Canada, with occasional research published in the 1920s and 1930s.

Article

Brooks Aqueduct

The Brooks Aqueduct, located about 8 km southeast of Brooks, Alta, is considered by many to be one of the most significant engineering feats in Canada. It has been declared both a national and a provincial historic site.

Macleans

BSE-Infected Cow Found in Alberta

DANNY ROSEHILL remembers well the Tuesday morning in September when he watched the terrorist attacks on New York City while the weekly sale at his cattle auction house in Olds, Alta., continued apace. "The towers were brought down, 3,000 people killed, and yet the sale went on," says Rosehill.